Verdict expected in complex and unique Knowledge House stock fraud case

first_imgHALIFAX – A much-anticipated verdict is expected Friday in the multi-million-dollar stock market fraud case stemming from the collapse of Halifax’s Knowledge House e-learning company.Former company president and CEO Daniel Potter and lawyer Blois Colpitts are jointly charged with a series of frauds.Their trial began in November 2015 and heard from 75 witnesses over more than 150 court days, and 184 exhibits were received — including thousands of documents.“Describing this trial as complex and unique would be a gross understatement,” Nova Scotia Supreme Court Justice Kevin Coady wrote in August 2017 in one of many mid-trial decisions.Knowledge House Inc. was once a high-flying developer of educational software, trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange before collapsing in 2001.The Crown alleges that between January 2000 and September 2001, Potter and Colpitts manipulated the price of the company’s shares.Shares in Knowledge House began trading publicly on the TSE in 1999, and went from a few cents to more than $9 before suddenly collapsing.Coady is expected to hand down a verdict on Friday, as well as a decision in a Charter application brought forward by the defence.Colpitts and Potter were among three people charged in 2011 with conspiracy to commit fraud, fraud affecting the public market and fraud over $5,000, following a seven-year-long RCMP investigation.The third, former National Bank Financial stockbroker Bruce Elliott Clarke, was sentenced in April 2016 to three years in jail after pleading guilty to conspiring to affect Knowledge House’s share price and defrauding a trust fund established by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America of more than $5,000.In 2015, Nova Scotia’s Court of Appeal ordered National Bank Financial to pay $3 million in punitive damages for the way it dealt with investors who lost money when the technology firm collapsed.Justice Jamie Saunders had said the money was owed to four investors who were affected when the company failed.The judge said National Bank had secured a confidential agreement with the Nova Scotia Securities Commission concerning the role it played overseeing the actions of a broker involved in the stock trades, and once that was revealed, it showed the bank didn’t properly oversee the actions of its broker.Justice Jamie Campbell said at Clarke’s sentencing that he had defrauded a union pension fund of close to $900,000, and that “only a significant period of time in jail is the fit and proper sentence.”Federal Crown prosecutor James Martin described in court at the time how Clarke used three main techniques to elevate the price of Knowledge House shares and spur on buying by investors.He said he used different accounts to continually buy the stock to make sure the price didn’t decrease and, in the process, spent millions to keep the stock price rising. He said Clarke also actively discouraged people from selling their stocks.“This was an incredibly sophisticated fraud,” Martin said. “He spent millions of dollars over the course of 18 months doing what they could to make sure the price of Knowledge House did not fall.”Martin said the fraud amounted to $31 million in total.The case against Colpitts and Potter has faced numerous delays. The pair have made every attempt to fight the fraud allegations. They even sought mistrial and stay of proceedings in July 2017.In a decision rejecting to hear that application, Coady noted the defendants had brought forward a “significant number of motions” throughout the trial.“These motions have consumed lengthy blocks of time and, for the most part, were not particularly successful. Many of these motions produced significant delay without any corresponding benefits to the trial process,” Coady said in a written decision dated July 26, 2017.Six months earlier, Coady had issued yet another decision after concerns were raised by the court about the lengthy proceedings.Before instituting a proposed schedule for the remainder of the trial, Coady noted: “This state of affairs cannot go on forever. The time has come for me to control this process which is presently chewing up massive judicial resources and blocking others from accessing the justice system.”last_img read more

Worst ways to die Ottawa asks if cruelty should be weighed in

first_imgOttawa is taking extra steps to find out if Canadians are still OK with killing wildlife in what one scientist calls “one of the worst ways to die on earth.”Health Canada’s Pest Management Review Agency has extended public consultations into whether it should consider cruelty before licensing poisons used to control large predators, including wolves.The most common of the three toxins under consideration is strychnine.The agency says it began the review in response to what it calls growing public concern about the humaneness of such chemicals.Alberta is one of Canada’s largest strychnine users, which uses it to kill wolves to help caribou herds survive in ranges heavily impacted by industrial development.Ryan Brook, a professor in the University of Saskatchewan’s agriculture department, calls strychnine one of the worst ways to die in terms of pain and remaining aware.A government spokesman says Alberta is talking with the federal government on the most effective and humane way to use toxins like strychnine.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Moroccan Civil Servant Sues Man Over Videotaping

Casablanca – A Municipal District employee has sued a man who shared a video of her in her office allegedly refusing to serve him.  A few days ago, a short video of an employee at the Tangier Municipal District refusing to serve a citizen has gone viral among Moroccan social media users.The video caused a flood of criticism and discontent among Moroccans, who considered it a perfect example of the humiliation they tend to undergo when dealing with public services. In response to the criticism, the woman in question made a video explaining the situation and shared it on social media to recount the complete story, which, according to her, started long before the scenes in the video.“Two citizens came to my office yesterday,” she begins. “I served the first one and he stood next to the wall waiting for his friend. The second one came and handed me a Work Contract. When I asked him about his ID, he said ‘I don’t have it’. Later, he got a tattered copy of his ID from his pocket.”The woman refused to use the copy of the ID and demanded the original document, as her job requires. In response, the man pulled a book out from his backpack and said, “This is a book on Law, find me one text here that says that a copy of the ID is not an official document.”The women added in the four-minute video that after a series of actions and gestures from the man, which included “provocative laughter and claps,” she had to move to next citizen in the queue since she could not help him “without the original ID card.”In reaction to this, the man objected strongly, as his video shows. However, what was not recorded in the video, the woman points out, is that their “provocative” actions escalated and included “swear words this time, which urged other citizens and personnel to stop them.”Recounting what happened after the last scene of the first video, the Municipal District employee says that the two men got into a skirmish with the personnel. This required the intervention of the head of the agency, who asked them to apologize to her.When she thought that the issue was resolved and went back to office, one of them followed her to office and threatened, “ I have shot a video, I will share [on social media] and make you regret it,” and then ran away.The woman concluded that she was later surprised when her son told her that a video of her spread on social media like wildfire. Immediately she prepared the necessary document and gathered the witnesses’ testimonies to sue them.With an expression of grief, the woman ends her video by saying that nothing will stand in front of her determination to take legal action against the disruptive citizens. read more

Court orders man to increase payments to wife who lost bulk of

first_imgA wife who lost the bulk of her divorce settlement by making “poor financial decisions” has been awarded larger monthly payments from her ex-husband despite calls from his lawyer for maintenance limits to reflect “social change”.Former estate agent, Maria Mills, 51, received a £230,000 lump sum in 2002, plus £1,100 monthly personal maintenance payments, when she split from her “reliable and truthful” 50-year-old husband, Graham Mills, after 13 years of marriage.But she lost it all and fell heavily into debt, after investing “unwisely” in a series of ever more “upmarket” London properties in a bid to climb the housing ladder, a court heard.Judges at London’s Appeal Court have now ordered that Mrs Mills’ monthly payments to be increased to £1,441 and told her ex-husband he must support her for life, because she is “unable to meet her basic needs”. The case was heard at the Court of AppealCredit:NIKLAS HALLE’N/AFP He should not be the insurer against the wife’s poor financial decisions… the time is long overdue for the wife to terminate her financial dependencyPhilip Cayford QC He told the judges: “The consent order made in 2002 was agreed on the basis that the wife received the vast bulk of the available cash, in order that she could buy herself a house and would not have to pay rent thereafter.”Since 2002, the wife’s management of her finances has been so poor that she appears to have exhausted her entire capital, and seeks to continue and now increase the periodical payments element of the order.”The husband has done all that could be reasonably expected of him in his reasonable wish to move on post-divorce.”The same cannot be said of the wife. It is a result of her poor financial decisions that the capital provision has been dissipated. The husband has played no part in the wife’s losses… and yet is expected effectively to pick up the tab.”The wife has already had the lion’s share of the capital and the husband’s maintenance obligation has already extended beyond the length of the marriage.”It is wrong in principle and in law that the wife should continue to depend, and indeed seek to increase, her dependence on the husband,” added the QC.But Frank Feehan QC, for the wife, pointed out that – while Judge Everall had found she was “not a good businesswoman” who “did not manage her finances wisely” and “took on too high borrowings” – he had not found that she was “profligate or wanton in her approach to her finances”.The judge had also accepted that her finances and ability to work had been “hindered” by health problems she has experienced over the last decade.Mr Feehan told the court: “Here was a woman, left (in 2002) with responsibility for a young child, without enough money to buy a house which was good enough in her view. It was reasonable for her to get a mortgage.”He admitted she “over-financed”, but told the judges: “She had health issues throughout and a child to bring up.” He defended her “credit card debts, run up over many years as a single parent having health difficulties”.”She has not been found to be wanton in having credit card debts in order to have a living wage for her and her son,” he added.Asking for an increase in maintenance, he said Mrs Mills is currently “unable to meet her basic needs”. Mr Mills earlier claimed that he “should not be the insurer against the wife’s poor financial decisions” and forced to “pick up the tab” 15 years after they split.His barrister, Philip Cayford QC, called for changes in the law to limit maintenance and encourage “independence” after divorce.Lord Justice Longmore and Sir Ernest Ryder heard that the couple, who have a grown-up son, married in 1988, separated in 2001 and divorced in 2002, after reaching an agreement on how their wealth should be split.Mr Mills, a surveyor, agreed to give his ex-wife, who formerly worked for a Notting Hill estate agent, £1,100 a month in personal maintenance, as well as almost all their “liquid capital” when they split, while he kept his businesses.Later, Mrs Mills “unwisely invested in a series of properties, each time moving upmarket” from a house in Weybridge, Surrey, to a smart three-bedroom flat in Wimbledon, to a two-bedroom apartment in a Victorian mansion block in Battersea.Each time she “over-financed,” increasing her mortgage liabilities, but failed to offset them with enough profit from the sale of the properties.After she sold the Battersea flat in 2009, she was “without any of the capital” from her marriage, and is now living in a rented home, back where she started in Weybridge. She now works two days a week as a beauty therapist, the court heard. Divorcee Maria Mills formerly owned a luxury flat in a Victorian mansion block in BatterseaCredit:Richard Gittins/Champion News Service  Court of Appealcenter_img The pair both went before a family judge last year, with the wife asking for more maintenance, because she could not manage financially, and the husband seeking a clean break.Judge Mark Everall QC threw out both their challenges, but they then each instructed QCs to renew their battle before the Court of Appeal.Mr Cayford told the judges Mr Mills, who lives in Guildford, has remarried, has a new family and is desperate to “move on” with his life.”This is a case where the wife leaves the marriage with all, or almost all the liquid capital, then says she needs maintenance for another 50 years, despite proving herself capable of working to a high standard,” he said.He called for changes to the law to limit spouses to “five years’ maximum maintenance,” telling the court: “There is a social change going on.”He said a decision in favour of the wife went against “the tide towards seeking independence,” telling the judges: “You can order some finality today.”It is the husband’s case that he should not be the insurer against the wife’s poor financial decisions, taken over the course of the 15 years that have passed since the original ancillary relief order… the time is long overdue for the wife to terminate her financial dependency on the husband.” She has not been found to be wanton in having credit card debts in order to have a living wage for her and her sonFrank Feehan QC, for Maria Mills Divorcee Maria Mills formerly owned a luxury flat in a Victorian mansion block in Battersea Sir Ernest, giving the court’s ruling, said Mr Mills had been regarded as “reliable, truthful and frank” by Judge Everall, who had been “less impressed with the wife”.”He has remarried and supports his new wife’s daughter as well as his own son. He also now has another child with his new wife,” he added.Of Mrs Mills he said: “The 2002 order vested in her the majority, if not all, of the liquid capital of the marriage.”She had unwisely invested in a series of properties, each time moving upmarket, with the consequence that she is now without any of the capital she was given in 2002.”She is not a good businesswoman. The wife now says the judge left her unable to meet her basic needs.”Judge Everall had calculated the wife’s “needs” at £1,441 a month, but had gone on to order that her monthly maintenance should not be increased from £1,100. But Sir Ernest said that “shortfall” was unexplained.”The judge made an error of principle. The order should have been that the husband pay maintenance in the sum of £1,441 a month until further order of the court,” he said. “The husband has and had the ability to make the maintenance payments asked for.”No value was put on Mr Mills’s business interests, but the court was told he had previously been able to draw dividends from them of up to £200,000 a year. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Extreme disorder results in 16 inmates being shot at Lusignan prison

…says no one died, nor did any prisoner escapeThe new holding area of the Lusignan Prison where the riots occurred  (DPI photo)Following reports of a prison riot at the Lusignan penitentiary’s new holding area, where approximately 400 prisoners transferred from Camp Street are held, the Department of Public Information (DPI) has confirmed that Prison Wardens were left with no choice but to use force to calm the ‘excessive disorder’ being exhibited by the inmates.Based on reports received, Sixteen prisoners were shot and are suffering from minor injuries, while another four suffered injuries as a result of fights among the prisoners. There were no deaths or escapes.According to the DPI, “Director of Prisons Gladwin Samuels, late this afternoon, confirmed that at approximately 16:20hrs today inmates at the holding area of the Lusignan Prison were involved in a series of assaults and aggressive conduct which resulted in extreme disorder and threatened their own safety, that of the joint services team providing security and could have escalated further and compromise the integrity of the facility.”The DPI said, as a last resort, the use of force, including firearms, was required to restore order and maintain the integrity of the holding facility.Three prisoners, who suffered minor gunshot wounds and two who suffered injuries as a result of fights, were taken to the Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation for treatment while the others were being treated on site at the Lusignan Prison Infirmary.“None of those who were shot are, at this time, deemed to be in a life-threatening condition” said the DPI.The Guyana Prison Service says it regrets that this course of action had to be taken but noted that it was left with no other option given the “extreme disorder which broke out in the holding area and the refusal of the prisoners to heed the commands of the officers to desist.” Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedSee list of prisoners injured following disorderly behaviour at LusignanJuly 31, 2017In “latest news”13 Lusignan prisoners escape, manhunt launchedJuly 24, 2017In “Crime”Fiery Camp Street jail break: 1 prison officer dead, several inmates injuredJuly 10, 2017In “Crime” read more

Falcon Lower Strike Point LSP insert to extend wear resistance

first_imgSepro Mineral Systems Corp is now offering an enhancement in design for the Semi-Batch 5200B Falcon Concentrator rotor bowl lining. The LSP insert has demonstrated significantly improved wear resistance during equipment operation. After a recent and extensive six-month R&D project, it was confirmed through field trial testing that the LSP insert provided greater wear resistance over rubber and ceramic lining under harsh wear conditions.Gerry Barstad, Chief Metallurgist – Detour Gold – explains: “Detour Gold ore has extremely aggressive wear characteristics for processing equipment and piping so we originally specified ceramic tile lining in our SB5200B Falcon Concentrators and associated piping. Sepro offered to develop an improved rotor bowl lining system to help extend wear life and reduce operating costs. The resulting moulded rubber Lower Strike Point insert ring is lasting about one-and-a-half to two times longer than the original ceramic tiles and knocks into place without removing the bowl. It effectively relines the lower bowl impact wear area very quickly and has demonstrated significant improvement in wear and reduced maintenance costs.I would highly recommend the new LSP Insert lining system for Falcon 5200B Concentrators to other gravity gold recovery operations.”Sepro is making the LSP insert available to all current Falcon SB5200B owners as a low cost retro-fit parts package. All new SB5200B units sold will incorporate this latest enhancement as the design standard. Sepro is developing plans to release the LSP Insert for the SB2500B Falcon model in the near future.last_img read more

I always bring my granny Stetsons stilettos and apple tarts at The

first_img“I always bring my granny”: Stetsons, stilettos (and apple tarts) at The Nathan Carter Show The fans are the real stars of the show, as we discovered in Sligo recently. Once inside, audience members were shepherded into the canteen for a (plastic) glass or two of wine. There was still a while to go before showtime, providing a chance for Carter’s granny, Ann, to sell some merchandise.“The mugs, the posters, the pillowcases,” are the best sellers, she said.The pillowcases in question are adorned with hearts and the title of one of her grandson’s songs – ‘Good Morning Beautiful’.“I’d say a few husbands have given those a punch,” Ann observed. I’m in relatively sunny Sligo to sit in on the recording of Nathan Carter’s TV show. pic.twitter.com/42Gfg7VwQ3— Daragh Brophy (@DaraghBroph) September 1, 2016 Oct 30th 2016, 10:00 AM 18,587 Views Source: Daragh Brophy/Twitter He’s so good with people as well – very friendly.On the way back to my car, I spot Brian Kennedy being persuaded onto a coach full of gig-goers and making his way down the aisle, signing autographs and posing for photos.Last year, the Belfast singer marked a quarter of a century since the release of his first single. Being nice pays off, apparently, in this country.The Nathan Carter Show airs on RTÉ One at 9.30pm this evening. Read: Optometrists are warning people not to wear cosmetic contact lenses this Halloween >Read: The painless man and reptile queen: Meet one of Ireland’s more unusual power couples > It’s not about drinking and drugs and whatever. You meet different people from all walks of life.Aisling Kennedy – at the recording with her mum and her aunt – said she also felt at home in the crowd.He appeals to so many age groups. Like, I’m only in my mid 20s but I always bring my granny and she’s in her 70s and she loves him just as much as I do. The fans are here. Lucy has seen Nathan 17 times. Joyce, 15 times. This year. #nathancarter pic.twitter.com/VKF5qpgrDe— Daragh Brophy (@DaraghBroph) September 1, 2016 Share131 Tweet Email By Daragh Brophy The singer, who’s been fronting versions of the Nathan Carter Show since his early childhood, is evidently taking the whole fame thing in his stride.His family has Irish roots, and Nathan has been playing for audiences on both sides of the Irish Sea since his early teens – becoming the star of countless Feis Ceoils and other music competitions, where he picked up medals in solo singing and accordion.He’s been fronting his own band for over half a decade at this stage, and is clearly dedicated to life on the road.It’s still a family affair too – Carter’s granny looks after the t-shirt stand, and his mum and dad will be front and centre in the audience for tonight’s show.That family focus may well explain part of his appeal. A sizeable demographic of Irish women, remember, once fell in love with a soft-spoken Donegal lad who adored his Mammy.The fansTwo hours out from the start of the recording, the ticket-holders began to show up.Carter’s audience, as you might imagine, are mostly female – but the fanbase seemed to span all ages, from young children to couples in their eighties.Two of his more mature fans, Anne and Esther, were first in the queue – propped up at the venue door on folding stools. It’s their second night along to the TV show recordings, they explained.My question about the singer’s appeal was met with quizzical looks and the following answer:“He’s such a good singer, such a lovely chap to talk to and a real gentleman,” said Anne.Added her friend:We’ve met him on numerous occasions.‘We’ve seen him 17 times’ Just behind them, two young women who had travelled all the way from Waterford for the show said they planned to follow him to his gig at the Lisdoonvarna Festival too, over the coming weekend.“This year alone we’ve seen him 17 times,” Lucy, sheltering from the rain next to her friend Joyce, enthused.Well, she’s seen him 15 times and I’ve seen him 17 times. Source: Daragh Brophy/Twitter Show’s over Disappointingly (I was getting hungry at this stage) there were no apple tarts handed in backstage for Nathan afterwards.However, true to his reputation, the singer hung around for as long as was needed. Everyone got a selfie. Everyone got their pillowcases signed.This was no time to try and talk to fans. But earlier, I’d spoken to a young woman called Christina, who had a slightly different insight into Carter’s appeal, and why people around Ireland are flocking, once again, to barn dances and country nights.“You feel safer,” she said.If you go to a mad nightclub or a mad pub or something – it’s crazy. When you go to a country night it’s all about the music and people you meet and to socialise. NATHAN CARTER IS a bona fide sensation in Ireland.How do we know?He’s fronting his own Sunday night TV show, for starters.He’s booked the biggest headline gig of his career in Dublin’s 3Arena next year.But also… people are baking him apple tarts. Does anything say ‘you’ve arrived’ in quite the same way as a long line of adoring fans carrying baked goods (and occasionally, cartons of pre-whipped Avonmore)? Source: Daragh Brophy/Twittercenter_img If it’s Thursday it must be Sligo  I only felt a slight pang of guilt as I sampled a slice of one of Nathan’s fan-baked tarts, backstage, on a rainy afternoon in early autumn (some careless staff member had just left it lying around apparently).Reaching the inner sanctum of Irish country music’s hottest talent hadn’t been difficult. I was there to sit in on the recording of his RTÉ series, the first installment of which airs tonight after the show had a successful pilot outing last Christmas.I’d be talking to the man himself at some stage in the day, if he had four-and-a-half-minutes to spare from his dawn-to-dusk production schedule.But the real stars of the show, I’d been told, were the fans.The word ‘dedicated’ doesn’t come close to doing them justice. They’ve been following the Liverpudlian singer (yes, he’s from Liverpool) to the ends of the Earth – showing up hours before gigs, and hanging around for selfies long after the final encore.Why Nathan? A veritable army of talented, clean-cut singers have been attempting to capitalise on the latest boom in country music in Ireland in recent years.So, aside from a slightly incongruous Merseyside accent (given the abundance of Western garb around) what does Nathan have that the others don’t?Why is this man (below) playing the Point, while his competitors struggle to fill mid-size ballrooms in regional hotels? Source: Sean SmythThe starThere were no fans around yet, so I began by putting that very question to the guy with his name over the door.Wandering into a backstage area at Sligo IT’s Knocknarea Arena for our chat, the 26-year-old star seemed remarkably unflapped, considering that he’s just started fronting his own weekly TV show.“It’s something that I never expected or thought about doing,” said Carter, nursing a cup of tea.They asked me to do the Christmas special. I did that and it got really great figures, you know, so they asked would I do a series and I said yeah.As our brief chat continued, I clumsily asserted at one point that he was being “held responsible” for latest boom in Irish country music (he didn’t seem to mind any perceived slight – but insisted, as you’d expect, that the scene was bigger than any one person).Back on safer ground, we got on to talking about the continuing appeal of a particular genre of county music here. “We’re not exactly herding cattle in the wilds of Wyoming, Nathan – so what’s it all about?”Said Carter:“I mean… Originally country came from Celtic music.It came with banjos, fiddles and accordions and they took it to the States and it developed from that into Bluegrass, into Cajun music and into country music, and that’s how – I think – it stems back that far. Some fans, it turned out, had eschewed the wine and the temptations of the merch stand to start queueing outside main auditorium almost as soon as they were allowed in the building.The line stretched all the way up the stairs and down the corridor by the time the doors finally opened.Once inside, after a quick word from the floor manager (don’t forget to clap, etc.) Nathan’s arrival – high-kicking, decked out in a stylish-if-not-particularly-country suit – was greeted with shrieks and hollers from the patient audience, as he launched into his opening number.Something for all the family I didn’t take many more notes after that. What followed stayed true to a tried-and-tested Sunday night TV variety format – something for all the family.Ex-Saturdays star Una Healy and former Man with Van Brian Kennedy were probably the best-known names on the bill, along with Kells indie group Ham Sandwich.Veteran Irish country star Philomena Begley and a chisel-jawed Antrim singer called Johnny Brady also joined Carter for a medley of Merle Haggard songs.Some of the banter between Begley and Brady was very funny, but wasn’t exactly pre-watershed friendly, so unfortunately won’t be in the show.I also wrote down: “Brian Kennedy really is a very good singer… Find a better way of saying that in an article”. Short URL Source: Daragh Brophy/Twitter 23 Comments Rehearsals under way since this morning at recording of Nathan Carter show. I’m told first fans should arrive soon. pic.twitter.com/sQfbSQlK6l— Daragh Brophy (@DaraghBroph) September 1, 2016 Source: Daragh Brophy/Twitter No stetsons so far but no shortage of stilettos. #nathancarter pic.twitter.com/sjbXkcna6e— Daragh Brophy (@DaraghBroph) September 1, 2016 He gives his time to the people. He respects his audience. He’s just a great overall kind of guy and he gives his time up. Sunday 30 Oct 2016, 10:00 AM He’s a great man. Not alone is he a great singer but he’s a great entertainer. I know people refer to him as the young Daniel O’Donnell – I’m a major Daniel O’Donnell fan as well. Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Nathan’s nan, on the pillowcases: “I’d say a few husbands have given those a punch” #nathancarter pic.twitter.com/7405dOShxu— Daragh Brophy (@DaraghBroph) September 1, 2016 http://jrnl.ie/2975298 last_img read more

Wheeling out dementia in ageing Greek populations

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Approximately 250,000 Greeks arrived in Australia between the 1940s and 1980s. Sixty years later, they are at high risk of developing cognitive illnesses, such as dementia. The problem is that none of the tests relating to diagnosing it are made with this population in mind, resulting in a lot of misdiagnosis. This is why Dr Mathew Staios rode all the way to Canberra from Melbourne to raise money towards Alzheimer’s research in the ageing Greek diaspora. “I left on Sunday 27 November from Melbourne and I got there on 4 December,” he tells Neos Kosmos.“Every night I’d stop to rest after completing an average of 80 to 90 kilometres per day.”There to welcome him at the Hellenic Club of Canberra after several long days and a total of 750 kilometres were the Ambassador to Greece in Australia Ekaterini Xagorari; High Commissioner of the Republic of Cyprus, Her Excellency, Ioanna Malliotis; Federal Member for Calwell, Maria Vamvakinou MP; Steve Georganas MP, Federal Member for Hindmarsh; Professor Michael Kyrios, from the Australian National University; Viola Alexandrou and representatives of Alzheimer’s Australia. Even though at times he felt his body was failing him, quitting was never an option.“I’m a stubborn, young Greek so the thought of giving up on my cause never crossed my mind. I’m determined and this project means the world to me.“It was emotional, exhausting, but generating awareness for this disease that’s taking a toll or our community is what kept me going. It was on my mind the entire time.”His research, counting two years now with the support of Monash University, aims to develop a range of new tests to detect dementia that will hopefully bridge the gap between science and culture and produce the world’s first measures to detect dementia in elderly Greeks. His research will serve as a template and guide interventions, not just within the Greek community, but within other established migrant populations within Australia. “Migrants are reportedly two to thee times more likely to be misdiagnosed using current tests,” Dr Staios emphasises, adding that these issues stemming from wrongful assessments will be even more detrimental to our community 20 to 30 years from now. “To me this ride was a massive accomplishment physically − I cried at the end − but what’s important is helping our parents and grandparents who may be misdiagnosed because of language and cultural differences.”While Dr Staios is recovering from the ride, he is already planning to start putting the tests into practice early next year, in order to be able to publish his new diagnostic tool in 2018. “I’ve managed to raise about $32,000 so far, but the goal was actually at least $45,000. Still, I am more than thankful as it was mainly everyday people who chipped in to help me raise the money,” he says.“I want to thank all the amazing individuals who got behind me, the Greek Community of Melbourne and Maria Vamvakinou in particular who’s been advocating on my behalf, but we still have a long way to go.”To find out more about this initiative and help realise the diagnostic tests book, show your support here: www.i-remember.com.aulast_img read more

Yahoo confirme ne pas vouloir fermer Delicious

first_imgYahoo confirme ne pas vouloir fermer DeliciousYahoo! a tenu à infirmer la rumeur selon laquelle l’entreprise souhaiterait fermer le service Delicious. Néanmoins, la plateforme d’échanges de favoris serait à vendre. Yahoo! a tenu à rassurer les internautes, qui s’inquiètent depuis la semaine dernière de voir Delicious dire ses adieux à la Toile (voir notre article). Même si Yahoo! compte licencier 4% de ses effectifs, le géant du web tient à préserver Delicious, service en ligne qui permet de sauvegarder et partager des URL : “Nous pensons activement au futur de Delicious et nous croyons qu’il existe en dehors de notre groupe un foyer pour ce site qui sera plus pertinent pour ses services et ses utilisateurs”, déclare Yahoo!, cité par Le Monde. “Nous sommes actuellement en train d’étudier toutes les options et nous avons débuté des discussions avec d’autres entreprises. Nous vous ferons part de nos projets dès que possible”. Ainsi, la vente est à l’ordre du jour, Delicious n’étant pas suffisamment rentable ou s’éloignant de la stratégie de l’entreprise. Mais le site devrait rester encore un moment sur le web. Le 20 décembre 2010 à 16:38 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

Sarri HudsonOdoi isnt distracted by Bayern link

first_imgChelsea head coach Maurizio Sarri singled out Callum Hudson-Odoi’s maturity for praise following the teenager’s performance against Tottenham in the EFL Cup.Hudson-Odoi, 18, started in his side’s 1-0 loss to Spurs in the first leg at Wembley on Tuesday despite interest from Bundesliga giants Bayern Munich.However, Sarri was happy with the way the player has gone about his business and further claimed Hudson-Odoi had shown no signs of being distracted by the transfer speculation.“Odoi in the last week has been very normal. I have seen him every day in training, he has been really very normal,” he told a news conference via FourFourTwo.Sacchi explains Sarri, Conte, and Ancelotti Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Arrigo Sacchi talked about how Sarri has a tougher time at Juventus than Conte at Inter; while Ancelotti’s “blood is boiling” at Napoli.Arrigo Sacchi…“He is improving, in the last match he played very well and also today I think a very good match.“He played like a player of 25 or 26 years, I think – very good match of application, very good in the defensive phase, very, very good.“He was completely normal in this period. I don’t know, maybe he doesn’t read anything.”last_img read more

WhatsApp boots 2M accounts a month to fight misinformation

first_img Tags Now playing: Watch this: 0 Post a comment WhatsApp is working on machine learning systems that can find and flag accounts with questionable activity, like sending bulk messages or creating multiple accounts for the sake of disseminating dubious content. Of the 2 million accounts banned, 75 percent were handled without a recent user report, according to WhatsApp.In January, WhatsApp put a limit on how many times a message could be forwarded in order to curb the spread of misinformation. The company, which has more than a billion daily users, began testing the message limit in India following a spate of mob violence and lynchings in that country blamed on misinformation spread on the social network. Meanwhile, Facebook deleted 583 million fake accounts within the first three months of 2018.  First published Feb. 6, 2019, 8:41 a.m. PT.Update, 9:58 a.m. PT: Adds comment and information from WhatsApp. 2:40 Facebook WhatsApp 11 WhatsApp features you might not know WhatsApp is trying to curb bulk messaging and fake accounts. SOPA Images/Getty Ahead of India’s national elections later this year, WhatsApp is trying to wrangle bulk messaging and fake accounts. Over the last three months, the Facebook-owned messaging has banned more than 2 million accounts each month for bulk or automated behavior. WhatsApp released a white paper on Wednesday detailing its efforts to curb this type of abuse, which can be used to distribute click-bait links or spread political misinformation to large groups of people.”WhatsApp was built for private conversations among close friends and we are constantly working to maintain the private nature of our service,” said a spokesperson in an emailed statement. “Today, we’re sharing more about how our advanced machine learning systems prevent automated behavior and bulk messaging to help keep WhatsApp safe.”VentureBeat, which attended a press briefing in New Delhi, earlier reported on WhatApps efforts. Mobile Share your voicelast_img read more

Telangana State tops Swachch Darpan rankings

first_imgHyderabad: The Telangana State has bagged first rank in Swachch Darpan programme at national level and six districts won prizes, according to state Panchayat Raj Minister Errabelli Dayakar Rao. The minister appreciated the officials, MPs, MLAs and local leaders for their role in making Swachch Darpan programme a success and bagging several prizes at national level. Also Read – Car mechanic held in Hyderabad for killing Class 10 girl in Jadcherla Advertise With Us A survey by the Union government has revealed that Telangana State emerged as Number One in the scheme and its six districts shown best performance, he informed. The minister attributed national rank in Swachch programme to the efforts of Chief Minister K Chandrashekar Rao and ensuring that the villagers use constructed toilets and maintaining clean and green environments. Also Read – Techie strangled to death in Hyderabad Advertise With Us The State was giving top priority for the use of toilets, promoting greenery under Haritha Haram and entrusting the job to the village level officials and sarpanches in this regard, he claimed. “In the third phase of survey by the Centre, Telangana State stood top in the list of States and we are proud for that”, Dayakar Rao said. Union Ministry for Water Resources has revealed the details of the survey, he said. Among 700 districts taken for survey, the Centre found that eight districts got first rank which includes six districts of Telangana State alone, the minister informed. Advertise With Us “This is a great achievement and we will make further steps to create awareness among the people in villages on Swachch Telangana and Haritha Haram and use of toilets by avoiding open defecation, he said. Telangana districts which stood first include Warangal Urban, Jagtial, Kamareddy, Peddapally, Rajanna-Sircilla and Karimnagar.last_img read more

Trump Macron call for new deal with Iran

first_imgUS President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron skahe hands during a joint press conference at the White House in Washington, DC, on Tuesday. Photo: AFPUS president Donald Trump and French counterpart Emmanuel Macron called for a “new” deal with Iran Tuesday, looking beyond disagreements over a landmark nuclear accord that still hangs in the balance.Trump laid transatlantic divisions bare during a visit by the French president, pillorying a three-year old agreement designed to curb Iran’s nuclear program.The US leader described the deal as “insane” and “ridiculous,” despite European pleas for him not to walk away.Instead, Trump eyed a broader “deal” that would also limit Iran’s ballistic missile program and support for militant groups across the Middle East.“I think we will have a great shot at doing a much bigger, maybe, deal,” said Trump, stressing that any new accord would have to be built on “solid foundations.”“They should have made a deal that covered Yemen, that covered Syria,” said Trump. “No matter where you go in the Middle East, you see the fingerprints of Iran behind problems.”Macron admitted after meeting Trump that he did not know whether the US president would walk away from the nuclear deal when a 12 May decision deadline comes up.“I can say that we have had very frank discussions on that, just the two of us,” Macron told a joint press conference with Trump at his side.Putting on a brave face, he said he wished “for now to work on a new deal with Iran” of which the nuclear accord could be one part.Neither Trump nor Macron indicated whether Iran would get something in return for concessions on its ballistic programs, activities in the Middle East or extending nuclear controls beyond 2025.Trump-true to his background in reality TV-teased his looming decision.“This is a deal with decayed foundations. It’s a bad deal, it’s a bad structure. It’s falling down,” the US leader said. “We’re going to see what happens on the 12th.”Trump’s European allies have repeatedly tried to persuade him not to abandon the 2015 deal, which gave Iran massive sanctions relief and the guarantee of a civilian nuclear program in return for limiting enrichment that could produce weapons grade fuel.German Chancellor Angela Merkel will renew those calls when she visits Washington on Friday.Iran, meanwhile, has warned it will ramp up enrichment if Trump walks away from the accord, prompting a blunt warning from the US leader.“They’re not going to be restarting anything. If they restart it, they’re going to have big problems, bigger than they ever had before. And you can mark it down,” he said.Simmering tensionsFor months American and European officials have been working behind the scenes trying to find a compromise on Iran that allows the mercurial US president to claim a public victory, while keeping the deal intact.More hawkish American officials accuse Europeans-particularly Germany-of putting business interests ahead of security, and of opposing a tougher stance against Iran to safeguard investments in the Islamic Republic.That charge is sharply rejected by European officials, who are increasingly frustrated at spending time dealing with Trump’s complaints rather than tackling Iran’s behavior.The disagreement threatens to plunge transatlantic relations to their lowest point since the Iraq War.Trump’s comments on Iran contrasts markedly with the exuberant welcome he gave the French leader.Tuesday morning both men waxed lyrical about shared heroes of yore-from the Marquis de Lafayette to Alexis de Tocqueville-as they listened to strains of “La Marseillaise” and “The Star-Spangled Banner.”Later, the Trumps rolled out the red carpet for the Macrons once more at a lavish state dinner-of which the US first lady was said to have fine-tuned every last detail, from gold tableware to white floral centerpieces, for star guests including Apple CEO Tim Cook and media mogul Rupert Murdoch.Melania Trump dazzled in a sequined Chanel dress of black Chantilly lace, while Brigitte Macron stepped out in a long-sleeved creamy white gown with gold lattice detailing by Louis Vuitton.“May our friendship grow even deeper, may our kinship grow even stronger, and may our sacred liberty never die,” Trump said in his toast to the Macrons.In turn, the French leader spoke at length of “how deep, how strong, and how intense the relationship is between our two countries,” and marveled at the unforeseen rapport he has forged with Trump.“I got to know you, you got to know me. We both know that none of us easily changes our minds, but we will work together, and we have this ability to listen to one another,” he said.The key question is whether Macron can translate that privileged relationship into concrete results-as he also pushes for a permanent exemption for Europe from US steel and aluminum tariffs.Earlier in the Oval Office, Trump offered a striking-and slightly awkward-sign of their much-vaunted intimacy.“We have a very special relationship, in fact I’ll get that little piece of dandruff off,” Trump said, swiping something off Macron’s jacket. “We have to make him perfect-he is perfect.”last_img read more

Houston Gears Up For Business With Cuba

first_imgDavid PitmanBob Pertierra with the Greater Houston PartnershipAlthough a comprehensive embargo remains in place, some trade barriers and travel restrictions have been reduced as the United States moves toward normalization of relations with Cuba.Bob Pertierra is the Chief Economic Development Officer for the Greater Houston Partnership, marketing Houston around the world.  Pertierra talks with News 88.7’s Ed Mayberry on this week’s Bauer Business Focus. 00:00 /03:33 Share Listen X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:last_img

Carol Ellinger Haddock Will Be First Woman To Lead Houstons Department Of

first_imgCity of Houston’s Department of Public Works and EngineeringCarol Ellinger Haddock has been chosen to be the director of the City of Houston’s Department of Public Works and Engineering.Mayor Sylvester Turner has appointed Carol Ellinger Haddock as director of the Department of Public Works and Engineering and she is the first woman to hold that position with the City of Houston.Turner notified the appointment to the members of the City Council on Wednesday.Ellinger Haddock has over 12 years of experience with the City of Houston and has been serving as interim director of the Department of Public Works and Engineering since July 12th 2017. Before joining the department, Ellinger Haddock worked for the Harris County Flood Control District where she led efforts to implement Project Brays.The City Council will officially confirm Ellinger Haddock’s appointment on January 10th. Sharelast_img read more

Detection Technology Introduces OfftheShelf Tileable CT Detector Module

first_imgVideo Player is loading.Mark Ibrahim explains what EPs need from CT imagingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 5:23Loaded: 3.08%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -5:23 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Siemens Go.Top CT scanner at SCCT19Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.14%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Video Player is loading.GE Cardiographe cardiac CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 26.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. Videos | AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting … read more Video Player is loading.Pierre Qian explains radiotherapy to ablate VTPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:34Loaded: 2.19%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:34 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Video Player is loading.Arthur Agatston explains the history of CT calcium scoring Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:54Loaded: 1.67%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:54 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the… read more Technology | Computed Tomography (CT) | November 13, 2017 Detection Technology Introduces Off-the-Shelf Tileable CT Detector Module Module easily scales up from 32-slice volumetric CT systems up to 256 slices Videos | Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, read more Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., F read more Video Player is loading.Cynthia McCollough explains new advances in CT technologyPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 13:56Loaded: 1.17%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -13:56 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Video Player is loading.Mahadevappa Mahesh discusses trends in medical physics at the 2019 AAPM meetingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 4:01Loaded: 4.04%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -4:01 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical pro read more Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read more November 13, 2017 — Detection Technology recently introduced the world’s first off-the-shelf, tileable computed tomography (CT) detector module, X-Tile. The four-sided buttable X-Tile detector module easily scales up from 32-slice volumetric CT systems up to 256-slices, enabling 160-millimeter coverage at isocenter and beyond.State-of-the-art performance is enabled by a pixelated, ultra-fast ceramic scintillator coupled on a high-performance backside illuminated (BSI) photodiode. The scintillator is made of high-light-output, ultrafast and the finest medical grade GOS (Gadolinium oxysulfide) compound. The characteristics of the most sensitive and ultra-low dark current photodiode are achieved through the company’s BSI photodiode manufacturing process.The active area size is 32 x 16 pixels, providing 512 channels that support simultaneous sampling up to a speed of 17 kSPS. The solution comes with a 24-bit ADC (analog-to-digital converter) providing fast, low noise and high-resolution analog-to-digital conversion. Furthermore, the module features an adjustable full-scale range. The solution is compatible with digital LVDS and CMOS interfaces.Engineering samples of X-Tile are available, and the volume shipments will start in the first quarter of 2018. Detection Technology will demonstrate the key features of the X-Tile at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 trade show Nov. 26-Dec. 1 in Chicago.For more information: www.deetee.com FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McColl… read more News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more Related Contentlast_img read more

Leaders debate drug strategy

first_imgNo related posts. President Laura Chinchilla announced on Wednesday her support for several major changes in Costa Rica’s approach to investigating and prosecuting drug-related crimes. Three new proposals would allow for extradition of Costa Rican nationals, change current wiretapping laws and increase penalties for criminals associated with drug trafficking and organized crime.“It’s hard to say when these proposals will pass in Congress,” Chinchilla said, “but they will send a clear message to criminal groups that Costa Rica is not a paradise for them to come and hide.”The president made the announcement at the opening of this year’s 52nd session of the Organization of American States’ Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD, in Spanish), a coalition of anti-drug commissioners from the region. The summit was held at Hotel La Condesa in Heredia, north of the Costa Rican capital. Chinchilla called Central America a victim of “perverse geopolitics,” trapped between countries in South America that produce illicit drugs and the United States, the world’s leading consumer of cocaine. She called on the U.N. Security Council to designate drug trafficking and organized crime as international acts of terrorism, adding that her administration would prepare a formal petition to be submitted to the U.N.Aside from being symbolic, Chinchilla said the terrorist designation would help security officials track down drug lords and crime syndicate kingpins. Labeling drug traffickers as terrorists also would make it easier to shut down their bank accounts and block them from traveling, she said.“We want the Security Council to consider narcotics trafficking and organized crime as a threat to peace and security internationally,” Chinchilla said. “From our point of view, this definition makes sense because in our nations, [the effects of drug trafficking] are similar to acts of terrorism in other parts of the world.”Tougher Local LawsChinchilla called on lawmakers to pass reform allowing extradition of Costa Rican nationals, currently forbidden by Article 32 of Costa Rica’s Constitution. The proposed amendment would permit Ticos wanted for drug trafficking and organized crime in other countries to be extradited for trial. The president also declared her intention of changing privacy laws pertaining to wiretaps. Currently, Article 24 of the Constitution states that only a judge is permitted to listen in on phone conversations during investigations. It is then up to the discretion of a judge as to which parts of the conversation can be turned over to investigating officers.“Costa Rica is the only country that has the law this way,” said Mauricio Boraschi, Costa Rica’s anti-drug commissioner and CICAD’s newly appointed president. “We use this tool frequently in this country, but with the way the law is today, we have a lot of operative problems. This is the next step we need to take.”The proposed change would still require a judge’s approval for actual wire tapping, but would allow investigators to listen to entire conversations. According to Boraschi, this would help eliminate confusion that has brought many investigations to a halt.Although no specifics were named, Chinchilla also proposed changes to the Costa Rican penal code to increase the severity of punishment for criminals arrested for drug trafficking and organized crime.Her administration also is drafting a treaty at the Foreign Ministry requesting all Central American countries, along with Colombia and Mexico, to team up for sea patrols in search of drug smugglers. Currently, every country in Central America and most countries in South America allow the U.S. to assist in coastal patrols.What Is the Region’s approach?At the CICAD summit, which ended Friday, regional anti-drug commissioners discussed several issues, including the decriminalization of illicit drugs, public health, corruption, alternatives to incarceration and an integrated new approach to drug use and trafficking. OAS Secretary General José Miguel Insulza joined the conference on Thursday.While CICAD Secretary General Adam Blackwell said Central American countries “have not sat idly by” in their efforts to defeat drug traffickers, some leaders expressed dismay over inconsistencies in Latin American anti-drug policy. Some countries – such as Uruguay – back legalization efforts, while other countries are looking to step up public security policy to better fight traffickers.“The magnitude of the problem that we are confronting is enormous, which leads us, the members of regional governments, to believe that it’s a battle that’s difficult to win,” Chinchilla said. “We’ve been paying a high price for valiantly confronting drug trafficking.”Blackwell, who was involved in solidifying a pact between rival gangs in El Salvador, submitted a report by the OAS on Thursday on the advances of alternative approaches to the illicit drug issue, as called for during the Americas Summit in Colombia last April.Chinchilla noted the “joint responsibility” of consuming nations, saying, “We’re never going to win if we don’t address consumption.”AFP contributed to this report. Facebook Commentslast_img read more

First woman to vote in Costa Rica dies at 95

first_imgThe date was July 30, 1950, when Bernarda Vásquez voted in a plebiscite to determine if residents of La Fortuna and La Tigra would join San Carlos canton or San Ramón, in the province of Alajuela. She, along with 25 others, became the first Costa Rican women to vote in the country. Residents opted to join San Carlos.Vásquez died on Wednesday at Hospital México in San José at the age of 95.According to the daily La Nación, Vásquez’s niece Claris Durán said Vásquez was mourning the death of her brother, who died three months ago. On Monday, she fell, injuring her head, and was rushed to the hospital where she died two days later.Vásquez, born in Palmares, Alajuela in 1918, never married and had no children.On Oct. 7, 2007, La Nación reported, she voted against the U.S.-Central America Free Trade Agreement, or CAFTA, in a national referendum. She voted for the Social Christian Unity Party in presidential elections held in February 2006. At the time, she said, “The worst a Costa Rican can do is not vote, because thanks to our political system, we’ve always had peace and tranquility.” Facebook Comments No related posts.last_img read more

UK airport expansion threatens to take out entire villages

first_img“There’s no compensation package that would interest me,” said Neil Keveren, who chairs a local community group opposed to the expansion. “We have a historic village with buildings that go back 600 years. You cannot replace that. You cannot buy memories.”Harmondsworth is under threat because London and southeastern England need more airport capacity to meet the growing demands of business travelers and tourists. Heathrow and rival Gatwick, 30 miles (50 kilometers) south of central London, have offered competing projects that will cost as much as 18.6 billion pounds ($29.1 billion). Whichever proposal is selected, homes will be destroyed and surviving neighborhoods will have to cope with increased noise, pollution and traffic.The issue is so toxic that politicians created an independent commission to weigh the options. Government officials then postponed a decision until after the May 7 election, effectively taking the matter off the political agenda, if but briefly.The commission is set to make its recommendation as soon as next month. It will then be up to political leaders to make the final decision. A furious public relations battle has raged in advance, with placards all over London’s subway system, for example, extolling the virtues of Heathrow or Gatwick. The commission has already rejected other options, including Mayor Boris Johnson’s proposal for a new airport in the Thames Estuary. LONDON (AP) — With its classic red phone booth, pub, and medieval church, Harmondsworth’s center looks quintessentially British. But the search for a twee English village isn’t what brings millions of people within a stone’s throw of its boundaries.The attraction is neighboring Heathrow Airport, which served 73 million travelers last year. Now Europe’s busiest airport is proposing to build a runway roughly through the center of town, leveling the ivy-covered brick walls of the Harmondsworth Hall guest house and two-thirds of its homes. A village that traces its history to the 6th century would be forever altered, and some argue even what’s left would be uninhabitable. According to the commission, all three remaining proposals, including two different plans to expand Heathrow, would meet the region’s needs, though the costs and potential benefits would vary. Gatwick, for instance, would cost an estimated 9.3 billion pounds and boost Britain’s gross domestic product by as much as 127 billion pounds. The most expensive Heathrow project would cost twice as much and boost GDP by up to 211 billion pounds, the commission estimates.Making the right decision is crucial as London seeks to retain a competitive edge.In a globalized world, airports offer the opportunity for investment bankers, lawyers, consultants and engineers to make face-to-face connections in major markets where deals are made, said John Kasarda, director of the center for air commerce at the University of North Carolina’s Kenan-Flagler Business School.“This is contact sport, particularly at the global level,” Kasarda said. “This isn’t done over the net.”And the ability to move — and connect — faster makes a country and its economy more competitive. Opting not to expand is a tacit acknowledgement that the government is willing to have some of those jobs go to a competitor, such as Paris, Amsterdam or Dubai. “It’s the survival of the fastest,” Kasarda said. “It’s no longer the big eating the small. It is the fast eating the slow.”But there is a human cost, as communities like Harmondsworth and others that might be affected know all too well.Heathrow external relations director Nigel Milton said he understands that some people are very upset, though he claims there are residents in Harmondsworth who support the project but might not want to come forward to support the idea. He acknowledges the local impact, but said the company would offer compensation packages — even to those whose homes would not need to be leveled but who would find themselves living next to a runway.“We believe we are being fair,” he said.Countries like Britain have struggled with the notion of balancing national gain with local pain. Harmondsworth and the nearby village of Sipson are “stylized examples of the challenge all big societies face: progress meets obstacles,” said Tony Travers, a professor of government at the London School of Economics.Britain has sought to strike a balance between growth and safeguarding its heritage, and grassroots conservation movements have grown up to protect cultural landmarks. Unlike communities such as Venice in Italy, Britain hasn’t allowed beauty to hamper progress — but that doesn’t mean it isn’t taken into account. Top Stories Ex-FBI agent details raid on Phoenix body donation facility “If Harmondsworth were not this beautiful village, this decision would be that much easier to make,” Travers said.Local campaigners say they’ve been told the latest proposal would avoid landmarks like St. Mary’s Church, which traces its history to the mid-11th century and the Great Barn, a 15th century oak-framed behemoth — 192 feet long, 37 feet wide and 39 feet high — dubbed the “Cathedral of Middlesex” by the late poet laureate John Betjeman.But opponents say the proposed runway would be so close to what’s left of the village that no one would be able to stand to live there because of the noise and the bad air. In other words, there’d be a church but no congregation, said archaeological scientist Justine Bayley.“They have no concern that they are screwing up the lives of hundreds of thousands of people for their shareholders,” she said of her village and others along the flightpath and in west London who are affected by the noise.Keveren nods. His fury is evident as he waves a 2010 election leaflet in which Prime Minister David Cameron’s Conservative Party pledged to fight Heathrow expansion. Keveren says he feels deceived. Arizona families, Arizona farms: providing the local community with responsibly produced dairy Milstead says best way to stop wrong-way incidents is driving sobercenter_img Comments   Share   Sponsored Stories New Valley school lets students pick career-path academies Natural spring cleaning tips and tricks for your home Top holiday drink recipes “My grandparents worked this land. I have war dead in the cemetery of the church. This is my home and if I am forced to leave here, who will it be for? Foreign investors,” he said spinning with outrage. “The message I would give to the world is that the British government can be bought.”Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvementlast_img read more

New frequent flyer division for Virgin

first_imgVirgin Australia has created a new subsidiary for its Velocity Frequent Flyer program. The rewards branch will be helmed by Neil Thompson who will join the company as division CEO in August 2012. The Velocity Frequent Flyer program will operate as a stand-alone business, with Mr Thompson reporting directly to Virgin Australia CEO John Borghetti. “Velocity Frequent Flyer remains a key growth opportunity for our business. We have done a lot of work over the past 18 months to create a solid foundation for the Frequent Flyer program,” Mr Borghetti said. Virgin Australia aims to position itself as the market leader in loyalty programs across the nation, driving future earnings and potential. “The Velocity Frequent Flyer program is critical to Virgin Australia’s goal of becoming the airline of choice in Australia and we are confident this new structure will help us achieve that”, Mr Borghetti added. Source = e-Travel Blackboard: P.Tlast_img read more