Residential care staff meet to discuss ‘exploitation’

first_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Residential care staff meet to discuss ‘exploitation’ By News Highland – March 10, 2014 Google+ Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp News Previous articleUpdate: Two men arrested in connection with Derry pipe bomb attacksNext articleMan shot in paramilitary attack in Derry News Highland Google+ Twitter Man arrested in Derry on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences released center_img Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest Dail hears questions over design, funding and operation of Mica redress scheme Facebook Dail to vote later on extending emergency Covid powers HSE warns of ‘widespread cancellations’ of appointments next week PSNI and Gardai urged to investigate Adams’ claims he sheltered on-the-run suspect in Donegal A meeting takes place in Letterkenny this evening to discuss what’s described as the exploitation of residential care staff by health employers.The unions IMPACT and SIPTU have called the meeting claiming that residential care staff are routinely expected to work 63 hour weeks, well above the legal maximum of 48 hours.The unions also take issue with the rate of pay to staff for so called sleepover duty.IMPACT organiser Una Faulkner says the current practice is not sustainable:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/unarawCARE.mp3[/podcast]last_img read more

Resident advisors to see changes in 2011

first_imgResident Advisors (RAs) at Saint Mary’s College will notice a change in their job description for the 2011-12 academic year. Changes to the RA policy mainly affect RAs’ academic breaks and their eligibility to hold other jobs, Karen Johnson, vice president of Student Affairs, said. Johnson said RA’s may not hold off-campus employment, and they will need to work as a team with their hall director to cover break periods when there are still students in the residence halls. “It’s a matter of safety,” she said. Johnson said some RAs will have to remain on campus during breaks for which students can choose to stay on campus. The rule doesn’t apply to winter break because students cannot stay in the dorms during that break. “As for covering break periods, staff must be available whenever the halls are open,” Johnson said. “Each RA will need to take a day or a few days of a break to be on campus and on duty in the halls.” The College made the changes to provide the best quality of service to the students living within the residence halls, Johnson said. “Holding off-campus employment often puts RAs in the position of having to juggle their schedules in a way that is compromising,” she said. “They have to ask other RAs to cover for them and may not be able to adjust their work schedules to meet the demands of an RA.” Johnson said she is confident that the changes to the RA policy will not affect the number of applicants for the positions this spring. “Being an RA is an important job and many students are interested each year,” she said. The changes will go into effect for the 2011-12 academic year. According to the College’s website, applications for the RA positions for the 2011-12 academic year were due Thursday. Applicants will undergo an individual interviewing process this week. Applicants undergo individual and group interviews. According to the website, the group interviews allow the current RAs and Residence Life staff to evaluate candidates through their participation in various group activities. “This process also gives candidates an opportunity to show how they work with others in a group or team setting,” the website said. Students receive letters on Feb. 25 announcing whether or not they were selected as an RA for the 2011-12 academic year.last_img read more

Advances in Electricity-Storage Technology

first_imgAdvances in Electricity-Storage Technology FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Utility Dive:2017 could go down as the year regulated utilities took the lead in energy storage.Several of the most notable energy storage projects this year were done by or for regulated utilities. And that momentum will likely carry into 2018 as well, Tim Gretjak, an analyst at Lux Research, told Utility Dive.In some cases, it is easier for a regulated utility to make the economic case for energy storage, Gretjak said. It is hard for developers of energy storage projects to compete in energy markets where the rules do not value the flexibility that storage can provide, he added. The trend could be bolstered by the fact that utilities across the country are beginning to include energy storage in their resource planning processes. In Oregon, for instance, Portland General Electric’s integrated resource plan proposes five storage projects. In New Mexico, the Public Regulation Commission amended the state’s 2017 IRP rules to include energy storage. High on the list of notable projects of the year is Tucson Electric Power’s (TEP) solar plus storage facility. The project is being built by NextEra Energy and features a 100 MW solar array and a 30 MW, 120 MWh energy storage system. It’s most notable feature, however, is its power purchase agreement.TEP reported that the all-in cost for the solar-plus-storage project was “significantly less than $0.045/kWh over 20 years.” TEP said the solar portion of the project, at under 3¢/kWh, was “the lowest price recorded in the U.S.” That puts the remaining storage portion of the project at about 1.5¢/kWh.The project marked the lowest price announced for a solar-plus-storage project to date, far outstripping the nearest contender, a 11¢/kWh PPA between Kauai Island Electric Cooperative and AES Corp. for a 28 MW solar array with a 20 MW, 100 MWh battery system on Kauai, Hawaii.Another of the year’s most notable projects also is in Arizona, but is being developed by Arizona Public Service. It is a much smaller project, 2 MW, 8 MWh, but is notable because it is being undertaken without a statutory or regulatory mandate.APS is building the project as an alternative to building about 20 miles of new transmission lines to serve the small community of Punkin Center about 90 miles northeast of Phoenix.APS has not disclosed the cost of either the storage project or the transmission lines, but estimates the batteries will enable it to defer investment in a new transmission line for up to six years. And during that time, the batteries will also deliver additional value by providing frequency regulation and bolstering grid reliability.T&D (transmission and distribution) deferral is a growing trend, especially among regulated utilities, Manghani told Utility Dive, but such efforts are also very specific, particularly when any individual  project can require regulatory approval.Another T&D deferral project recently surfaced in Massachusetts where National Grid has plans to install a 48 MWh energy storage system on the island of Nantucket. The storage project will help back up a new diesel generator on Nantucket and defer investment in a new subsea cable to the island.In North Carolina, Duke Energy in April won regulatory approval to build a 10 kW solar installation with a Fluidic 95 kWh zinc-air battery in the Great Smoky Mountains of Haywood County. The energy storage system will power a remote communications tower in the national park that is currently served by an overhead transmission line.Duke says the microgrid project, which would cost less than $1 million, is less expensive than upgrading and maintaining the existing four-mile 12.47-kV distribution feeder that travels over rugged mountain terrain and is due for upgrades this year.The project demonstrates the “practicality” of energy storage, Gretjak said.Duke also plans to invest $30 million in two battery storage systems in North Carolina, which the company says will be the first large storage projects built by its regulated utility. “Battery technology has matured, and we are ready to take the next step. We can go to regulators and say this makes economic sense, Duke spokesman Randy Wheeless told Utility Dive at the time.Energy storage once again made market inroads this year, as it did last year, by responding to emergencies. Last year, energy storage’s value was on display when it was called on to respond to the Aliso Canyon gas leaks that threatened gas supplies to power plants critical to reliability in Southern California. Following a call by state regulators, developers stepped up to quickly build several large storage projects to support grid reliability in the region. One of those project, Powin Energy’s 2 MW, 8 MWh battery system in Irvine, came online in January.In March, Tesla CEO Elon Musk tweeted that he could solve blackouts that have been plaguing South Australia by installing a battery storage system in 100 days or it would be free. Tesla made good on Musk’s promise this week, nearing completion of a $50 million, 100 MW, 129 MWh storage system at Neoen’s 315 MW Hornsdale wind farm. The storage system, which would be the largest in the world, is expected to come online Dec. 1.The Tesla project could soon be overshadowed by a massive 100 MW, 500 MWh storage system that is expected to “be the cornerstone of a new smart energy grid” in Hubei Province, China. The vanadium flow battery project is being built by Hubei Pingfan Vanadium Energy Storage Technology Co., a subsidiary of Hubei Pingfan, a mining and industrial metals and minerals company that has about 1 million tonnes of vanadium in its reserves.The China project may not have much overlap with U.S. projects because the energy markets in the two countries are so different, but China’s push could demonstrate the value of flow batteries and might aid the economies of scale for the technology. More: Top energy storage projects driving the sector in 2017last_img read more

​Liverpool, Real Madrid keeping tabs on Inter Milan midfielder Brozovic

first_img The Croatian has been a star for club and country, helping Inter to a league title-challenging position this season. The 27-year-old has a contract with the club until 2022. But Mundo Deportivo suggests that Real want to sign Brozovic to replace compatriot Luka Modric in the summer. Liverpool have previously been linked with the player in the English press. It is unclear if Brozovic wants to leave Inter, as he appears to enjoy working with Antonio Conte, who took over at the historic club this summer.Advertisement Real Madrid and Liverpool are the two teams with the most interest in Inter Milan midfielder Marcelo Brozovic. The Croatian has been a star for club and country, helping Inter to a league title-challenging position this season. The 27-year-old has a contract with the club until 2022. But Mundo Deportivo suggests that Real want to sign Brozovic to replace compatriot Luka Modric in the summer. Liverpool have previously been linked with the player in the English press. Read Also:La Liga: Hazard returns for Real Madrid as Barca struggle to keep their sparkle It is unclear if Brozovic wants to leave Inter, as he appears to enjoy working with Antonio Conte, who took over at the historic club this summer. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted ContentWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?You’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The UniverseBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A Drone8 Best 1980s High Tech GadgetsFascinating Ceilings From Different Countries10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do11 Most Immersive Game To Play On Your Table TopWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?10 Phones That Can Work For Weeks Without Recharging Loading… Real Madrid and Liverpool are the two teams with the most interest in Inter Milan midfielder Marcelo Brozovic.last_img read more