Michael Sams Father Denies Critical Comments About His Son

The father of college football star Michael Sam said he was “terribly misquoted” by The New York Times in a recent article about the reaction to his son’s announcement that he is gay.“I did not say anything about my grandkids,” the Galveston Daily News quoted him as saying.Michael Sam Sr. told the paper he doesn’t want people to think he has an issue with his son’s sexual orientation.On Sunday, Michael Sam said in interviews with ESPN’s “Outside The Lines” and the Times that he is gay. Sam originally revealed the news to his Missouri teammates in August.In the Times piece this week, his father described himself as “old school” and is quoted in the newspaper as saying the idea of a gay player in the NFL bothers him, even if that person could be his own son.However, he backtracked from those comments with the Galveston Daily News, saying he never told the Times he was an old-school, “man-and-a-woman type of guy” or that he didn’t want his grandkids “raised in that kind of environment.”Sam Sr. did acknowledge much of what he told the Times was accurate, but he said some of his thoughts were taken out of context, specifically a quote about Hall of Fame defensive lineman Deacon Jones “turning over in his grave.”“I told them Deacon Jones is going to roll over in his grave because here comes my son and that he’s going to be a star in the NFL,” Sam Sr. told the Galveston Daily News.The Times, in an email to the Galveston paper, defended its reporting and said Sam Sr. was quoted “accurately and fairly.”The elder Sam also said he has had time to reflect on his relationship with his son. He said he loves his son, that he did the right thing and that he wishes he’d spent more time with him.The Times previously reported that when Sam returns to his hometown in Texas he usually stays with friends instead of his family. read more

Ambassador Tony S Joudi Paid Courtesy Call on the Prime Minister of

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, November 2, 2017 – Nassau – His Excellency Tony S. Joudi, Bahamas Ambassador to the UAE and the State of Qatar (left) paid a courtesy call and presented a gift to Prime Minister, Dr. the Hon. Hubert Minnis, Monday, at the Office of the Prime Minister.(Photo/Yontalay Bowe, OPM Media Services) Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img

How to Move Your Business Data into the Cloud Safely

first_img Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Gregory Potter, data analyst at market research firm In-Stat.Photo© Jeff NewtonQ: Which business apps should I put in the cloud, and which should I keep in-house to avoid a security breach?Cloud services are rapidly becoming a more efficient, more scalable and less costly way for small businesses to manage data, applications and websites. Both public and private cloud services let businesses keep IT overhead low while encouraging flexibility for users to access corporate data from just about anywhere on any device.But some high-profile outages and mishaps within the last year serve as a reminder that outsourcing IT to the cloud does not come without risk. Last April, a cloud data center outage affected Amazon Web Services clients. A Google Gmail outage two months earlier resulted in some business clients losing e-mails.Companies like Microsoft and Dropbox also have had problems, and though overall such occurrences may be rare, businesses should pause before migrating their IT assets en masse to the cloud, says Gregory Potter, data analyst at market research firm In-Stat. “Small businesses can make great use of cloud services, but nothing is 100 percent reliable,” he says. “You just have to be smart about these things and plan for the possibility of disaster.”Start by looking at how you want to use the cloud, and what type (public or private) best fits your needs and budget, Potter says. Some small businesses use cloud services primarily for productivity applications–services like Salesforce.com, Google Apps and Microsoft’s Office 365. Services from Mozy, Dropbox and Apple also can be used to store content and archived files now clogging desktops and office servers. In addition, small businesses can use the cloud for web hosting from providers like Rackspace, Amazon and Verizon.”The great advantage to using cloud hosting is that it is immediately scalable, so that if your website suddenly gets a large number of hits, you can be confident that it won’t crash or slow down to a crawl,” Potter says.Public cloud services have the advantage of being inexpensive–as cheap as $5 per user, per month–but they are also the services that have grabbed headlines for their disruptions. A private cloud service, involving rental servers from a company like VMware, is a more secure option, Potter says.”A private cloud is definitely more secure than a public cloud, but you are buying servers and software, and it could be cost-prohibitive,” he says.Ultimately, employ common sense. “Maybe start by doing e-mail and some productivity stuff through the cloud, but maybe not mission-critical functions and sensitive business data,” Potter says. “You may also want to have your own local IT backup to the cloud service … just until you find your comfort level.”  This story appears in the September 2011 issue of . Subscribe » September 1, 2011 3 min read Register Now »last_img read more

Autodesk acquires PlanGrid for 875 million to digitize and automate construction workflows

first_imgYesterday, Autodesk, a software corporation for the architecture, engineering, construction, and manufacturing, announced that it has acquired the leading provider of construction productivity software, PlanGrid for $875 million net of cash. The transaction is expected to close during Autodesk’s fourth quarter of fiscal 2019, which is, ending January 31, 2019. With this acquisition of the San Francisco based startup, Autodesk will be able to offer more comprehensive, cloud-based construction platform. PlanGrid software, launched in 2011, gives builders real-time access to project plans, punch lists, project tasks, progress photos, daily field reports, submittals and more. Autodesk’s CEO, Andrew Anagnost, said, “There is a huge opportunity to streamline all aspects of construction through digitization and automation. The acquisition of PlanGrid will accelerate our efforts to improve construction workflows for every stakeholder in the construction process.” According to TechCrunch, “The company, which is a 2012 graduate of Y Combinator, raised just $69 million, so this appears to be a healthy exit for them.” In an interview with CEO and co-founder Tracy Young in 2015 at TechCrunch Disrupt in San Francisco, she had said, “the industry was ripe for change. The heart of construction is just a lot of construction blueprints information. It’s all tracked on paper right now and they’re constantly, constantly changing”. When Tracy started the idea in 2011, her idea was to move all that paper to the cloud and display it on an iPad. According to Tracy, “At PlanGrid, we have a relentless focus on empowering construction workers to build as productively as possible. One of the first steps to improving construction productivity is the adoption of digital workflows with centralized data. PlanGrid has excelled at building beautiful, simple field collaboration software, while Autodesk has focused on connecting design to construction. Together, we can drive greater productivity and predictability on the job site.” Jim Lynch, Construction General Manager at Autodesk, said, “We’ll integrate workflows between PlanGrid’s software and both Autodesk Revit software and the Autodesk BIM 360 construction management platform, for a seamless exchange of information between all project members.” Autodesk and PlanGrid have developed complementary construction integration ecosystems using which customers can connect other software applications. The acquisition is expected to expand the integration partner ecosystem, giving customers a customizable platform to test and scale new ways of working. To know more about this news in detail, visit Autodesk’s official press release. Read Next IBM acquired Red Hat for $34 billion making it the biggest open-source acquisition ever Could Apple’s latest acquisition yesterday of an AR lens maker signal its big plans for its secret Apple car? Plotly releases Dash DAQ: a UI component library for data acquisition in Pythonlast_img read more